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Serving those who have served our nation

Special Advertorial Education Section - New resource center opens doors for student veterans

Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology
Serving those who have served our nation
BFIT President Anthony Benoit, Student Veterans of America President Ryan Hadfield and Massachusetts Secretary of Veterans’ Services Francisco Ureña officially open the Veteran Resource Center. “Places like student veteran centers, and organizations like Student Veterans of America are fostering that camaraderie while they were in service, and continuing that while they’re in the field of education,” Ureña said. (Photo: Photo courtesy Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology)

Author: Photo courtesy Partners HealthCareDr. Peter Slavin, left, joins Mayor Martin Walsh along with healthcare leaders at the Charlestown Health Center to present a grant to help combat opioid abuse.

Author: Photo courtesy Benjamin Franklin Institute of TechnologyJhony Martinez, Latino Student Veteran, U.S. Marines Corps, served 4 years in active duty and did two tours to Afghanistan. As an infantry rifleman and point person, I served as the eyes and ears for my squad. Currently pursuing his Bachelor’s Degree in Automotive Management from Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology. While going to school, he works at National Tire and Brake. He has his sights on being a district manager, overseeing sales and marketing at a dealership or automotive parts company.

Author: Photo courtesy Benjamin Franklin Institute of TechnologyMassachusetts Secretary of Veterans’ Services Francisco Ureña was on-hand to celebrate Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology’s Grand Opening of its Veteran Resource Center.

Why BFIT is a great FIT for Veterans

The non-profit college has served students pursuing careers in technology since 1908, and has a long history of providing hands-on education programs for U.S. veterans.

  • Veterans use their Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits to pay for tuition, fees, books and tools.
  • Yellow Ribbon certified, enabling the college to make additional funds available for veterans’ college education that is not covered in their Post-9/11 GI benefits
  • 14 hands-on technology programs that equip you for rewarding jobs
  • Our graduation rate is 2X the state average for 2-year colleges
  • Student-to-faculty ratio: 11:1 for individualized attention
  • Multiple layers of academic support, including free tutoring

For more information, visit bfit.edu/veteran

Massachusetts Secretary of Veterans’ Services, Francisco Ureña, was on-hand to celebrate the Grand Opening of the new Veteran Resource Center at Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology (BFIT). “I congratulate you on behalf of Governor Baker and the 365,000 veterans that call Massachusetts home. Make sure that veterans and families of veterans know about the great work that happens here and how they too can succeed,” said Ureña to student veterans, faculty and staff. “Thank you for starting the Student Veterans of America chapter here at this great school and finding that next path of success for all of our veterans.”

Since 2008, Student Veterans of America (SVA) has helped those returning from military service obtain the resources, support and advocacy needed to achieve success in higher education. BFIT was recently recognized as a student chapter of the SVA and has quickly built the capacity to support the growing number of student veterans at the college. Thanks to a grant from SVA in partnership with The Home Depot Foundation, the center will serve as a private designated space for student veterans to congregate, study, host meetings, and access veteran-related resources.

This month, BFIT was officially named a 2016 Military Friendly® School “for exhibiting leading practices in recruiting and supporting post-military students.” The non-profit college has served students pursuing careers in technology since 1908, and has a long history of providing hands-on education programs for U.S. veterans. Today, student veterans are eligible for funding through the Post-9/11 GI Bill and receive other financial incentives that cover the costs for tuition, books, and living expenses. The college is also recognized as a Yellow Ribbon college, which enables the college to make additional funds available for veterans pursuing a college education without an additional charge to their GI Bill entitlement.

“Members of the armed services understand what it means to participate in something that is bigger than the individual. They set aside their personal goals and needs to bring about a higher aim and a greater good,” said BFIT President Anthony Benoit. “We are very honored to have you among us and delighted that you brought this to fruition.”

The hands-on degree programs and affordable tuition make a BFIT education a cost-effective pathway to a high-paying career for U.S. veterans returning from service. With a growing number of service members returning to civilian life, the college is committed to increasing the support systems at the college for veterans, ensuring that veterans have access to the resources they need to succeed, and building a sense of community at the college.

Current BFIT student veterans like Jhony Martinez have thrived at the college. Martinez served 4 years in active duty and did two tours to Afghanistan. As an infantry rifleman and point person, he served as the eyes and ears for his squad. While pursuing his Bachelor’s Degree in Automotive Management, he is working part-time in the automotive industry. He has his sights on being a district manager, overseeing sales and marketing at a dealership or automotive parts company. “The military prepared me to be a leader. This program is also teaching me to be a leader,” Martinez said. “It definitely feels like home and it gave me an opportunity to save money for my future.”