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Roxbury homecoming brings community together

From 1996 origins, event has grown into celebration of Roxbury residents

Yawu Miller
Yawu Miller
Yawu Miller is the Banner’s senior editor. VIEW BIO
Roxbury homecoming brings community together
The Roxbury Homecoming/Junteenth celebration brings Roxbury residents past and present to Franklin Park for a day of reunions and reminiscences. BANNER FILE PHOTO

The idea for Roxbury Homecoming came during a funeral in 1996.

“We realized that we always get together at funerals or tragic occasions,” organizer Evelyn Thorpe told the Banner in a 1998 interview. “Everybody always talks about ‘yeah, we should get together,’ but nobody ever does anything about it.”

BANNER FILE PHOTO

BANNER FILE PHOTO

Thorpe and a core group of folks made connections through old networks of what were in the 1940s and 1950s called “gangs” but were really more like social clubs. In the first year they drew a crowd estimated at 2,000 people. Since then, the event has grown steadily, drawing Roxbury residents and expatriates from across the country.

This Saturday, June 15, families, old gangs and other groups stake out spaces with tents, awnings and chairs. Grills, coolers and tables laden with food and drink provide refreshments. Deejays spin classic soul and disco. Walking through the gatherings, held in Franklin Park, is like an open-air reunion that spans decades of Roxbury history.

BANNER FILE PHOTO

BANNER FILE PHOTO

Generations of Roxbury’s daughters and sons reminisce about the neighborhood in which they came of age and the people, places and institutions that made it special. Many artifacts from Roxbury’s past, like the hulking steel elevated Orange Line that ran through Dudley Station, are long gone. Gone too are whole sections of Roxbury, like the Madison Park neighborhood that was razed during urban renewal. Although Dudley Square is making a comeback, many at the Reunion recall the days when the busy shopping hub included a movie theater, Woolworths and a train, bus and trolley depot.

By 1999, organizers of a Boston Juneteenth celebration sought to combine the commemoration of an announcement ending slavery in Texas with the reunion. Although some refer to the Roxbury Reunion as Juneteenth, it’s clear that for most who turn out the day is about the Roxbury experience.

For this year’s celebration, expect to see the same old gangs and tents of friends celebrating the ’50s, ’60s, ’70s and ’80s. Expect to see some candidates, too. With contested City Council races, Boston’s political class will likely be out and about. But, as always, it’s Roxbury history that will occupy center stage.

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