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Nutrition and sickle cell disease
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Nutrition and sickle cell disease
The link between nutrition and sickle cell disease (SCD) might not be readily apparent at first blush. It’s all about the red blood cells.
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Physical activity and sickle cell disease
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Physical activity and sickle cell disease
Billy Garrett, Jr. is just following in his grandfather’s footsteps. Bill Garrett was the first African American to play regularly on a Big Ten Conference varsity basketball team. Garrett, Jr., 26, shares his grandfather’s passion for basketball. He has played for the NBA G League as well as the New York Knicks. He’s now a shooting guard for the basketball league in Poland. Yet, Garrett has sickle cell disease.
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Bone marrow transplant
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Bone marrow transplant
Constance Benson, 34, insisted that she had control of her sickle cell disease. In an interview for Be the Match, a program that helps patients in their quest for bone marrow transplants, she stated “I have sickle cell, but sickle cell does not have me. I’ve got this.” But she didn’t.
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Sickle cell disease: A mother’s story
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Sickle cell disease: A mother’s story
When kids suffer the pains of a sickle cell disease crisis, they often don’t go through it alone. Their mothers are right there with them even feeling the same pain in their own way.
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The transition to adult care: A big step for those with sickle cell disease
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The transition to adult care: A big step for those with sickle cell disease
The transition period is a turning point for young people with sickle cell disease. It’s hard enough for adolescents to begin to assume the mantle of adulthood. For those with SCD, the task is even more challenging.
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Living longer with sickle cell disease
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Living longer with sickle cell disease
Programs for adults with sickle cell disease are on the increase in this country. That’s good news, but the bad news is that at one time the necessity was low.
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Sickle cell disease
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Sickle cell disease
The newborn looks perfect — ten fingers, ten toes and a headful of hair. But a blood test may tell a different story.
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Not your father’s heart attack
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Not your father’s heart attack
You would think that a woman’s heart is just a smaller version of a man’s. And in some ways it is. It has four chambers and is nourished by a network of arteries. But a closer look can show some differences.
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Have a heart: It’s the only one you’ve got
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Have a heart: It’s the only one you’ve got
The heart has a pretty big job. It feeds the entire body. With every beat it distributes life-saving oxygen and nutrients to vital organs and muscles.
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An unforeseen heart attack
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An unforeseen heart attack
Wayne Ysaguirre, 55, was no stranger to exercise. When the Roxbury YMCA opened at 5 a.m., he was one of the first through the doors. He had a routine — an hour and a half of aerobics on one of the Y’s exercise machines. He at first ignored the pain in his chest that occurred when he picked up the pace of his workout. Since the pain subsided when he slowed a bit, it was not serious, he reasoned.
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Heart attack: Call 911
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Heart attack: Call 911
Even with ready access to emergency medical services, many people experiencing a heart attack drive themselves to the hospital. They assume they can get there faster and prefer not to cause a fuss. But an ambulance can reach you before you reach the hospital. They have the right of way and can run through red lights. It’s not necessarily the speed that’s important here. Your condition can worsen while driving and, although not common, you can go into cardiac arrest. Survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests is very low.  
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Age is just a number: Not too young for a heart attack
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Age is just a number: Not too young for a heart attack
If you asked Megan Corbin to describe a typical heart attack victim, she undoubtedly would not include herself. Yet, last year at the age of 30, that’s exactly what happened to her.
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