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In the news: Ron Savage

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U.S. soccer thrives with international players
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Sports
U.S. soccer thrives with international players
South American-born soccer players Tab Ramos, Claudio Reyna, Marcelo Balboa and Fernando Clavijo played key roles for the United States in the 1990s and early 2000s World Cups. A wave of German-born players — Thomas Dooley, Jermaine Jones, Fabian Johnson, John Brooks — progeny of American military fathers and German moms, also opted to play for Uncle Sam.
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Sports
Qatar’s World Cup bid casts shadow on FIFA
Soccer great Pelé is largely credited with calling his sport “The Beautiful Game,” an affectionate phrase its media and admirers still like to turn to when other adjectives escape them. But a closer look into soccer’s inner workings occasionally takes a bit of shine off the world’s biggest professional sport.
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PGA Tour, LIV Golf fight for diverse, millennial fans and the future of golf
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Opinion
PGA Tour, LIV Golf fight for diverse, millennial fans and the future of golf
The city of Boston finds itself at a unique crossroads for professional golf this summer. In June, the Hub played host to the U.S. Open, America’s oldest championship, at The Country Club, a founding member of the United States Golf Association in 1894 and home to Francis Ouimet’s seminal national championship victory in 1913. This Labor Day, the upstart LIV Golf series comes to Boston for just its fourth ever event, offering a glimpse at what the future of the game may look like.  
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International basketball players changing the game
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Sports
International basketball players changing the game
While Black Americans still make up more than 73% of the NBA's players, two European stars — Greek Giannis Antetokounmpo and Serbian Nikola Jokic — have won the last four regular-season NBA MVP honors.
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Interns steeped in golf culture at U.S. Open
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Local News
Interns steeped in golf culture at U.S. Open
Last month, as 2022 U.S. Open champion Matt Fitzpatrick hoisted the trophy for photos at The Country Club’s 18th hole, Jada Richardson and Kendall Jackson were on the green. Both Division I golfers from Howard University were wrapping up a week of V.I.P. access as Lee Elder interns.
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Irving’s missed games raise ‘load management’ allegation
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Sports
Irving’s missed games raise ‘load management’ allegation
It used to be met with suspicion when NBA players sat out regular-season games with dubious injuries. Known euphemistically as “load management,” the concept is so ingrained now it has become tongue-in-cheek and gives off an air of inmates running the asylum.
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Blacks integral to history of golfing
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Local News
Blacks integral to history of golfing
In two weeks, The Country Club, Brookline’s prestigious private course whose name needs no elaboration, will take center stage in the world of golf for the 2022 U.S. Open. In advance of the attention and scrutiny that come with hosting one of the sport’s four major championships, The Country Club rolled out a new internship program to introduce college students from underrepresented backgrounds to the cloistered business of golf: the Lee Elder Internship.
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Colombian soccer star was national hero
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News
Colombian soccer star was national hero
Colombian soccer player Freddy Rincon is forever linked with one of the most rapturous moments in the history of his resource-abundant but historically-turbulent country.
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News
Contracts: when NBA players play themselves
Former NBA star Latrell Sprewell two decades ago turned down a $21m contract extension, foolishly exclaiming that he “had a family to feed.” Unless he was preparing his offspring as future candidates for “My 600-Lb. Life,’’ his comment was highly misguided. Sprewell never got another offer, and despite making close to $100 million in career earnings, he allegedly fell on hard times, although it’s never quite clear if athletes in these situations go completely broke or just lose portions of their vast earnings.
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MLB Finally Recognizes Negro League Players as Major Leaguers
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News
MLB Finally Recognizes Negro League Players as Major Leaguers
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VIDEO: Rob Parker Talks Major League Playoffs
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News
VIDEO: Rob Parker Talks Major League Playoffs
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News
The NFL still says Kaepernick isn’t being blackballed; here’s why they’re wrong
The NFL guys routinely back up their assertion that Kaepernick is unemployed by endlessly saying, first, it’s a football decision, and second, the NFL is not racist because it is overwhelmingly black, with lots of black coaches and GMs. Many are making big bucks and often make key personnel decisions.
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