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black history

Trace Boston’s black history from the comfort of your home
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Arts & Culture
Trace Boston’s black history from the comfort of your home
The Boston Public Library’s Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center has unveiled its latest research tool: Atlascope. The online resource, accessible from anywhere with an internet connection, allows researchers and history buffs to view historic maps of Greater Boston overlaid on the contemporary maps we use today.
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A 19th century photo album comes to life
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Local News
A 19th century photo album comes to life
A rare collection of 19th-century photographs, belonging to a slavery survivor, abolitionist and Underground Railroad conductor, are now available online through the Boston Athenaeum. With one click, people from all over the world can now view the historic portrait albums of Harriet Hayden.
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Still flying  high
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Black History
Still flying high
The legacy of the Tuskegee Airmen continues to inspire almost 80 years after African Americans were first allowed to become U.S. military pilots. Reviving their glory, the Commemorative Air Force’s Red Tail Squadron celebrates black history with Rise Above, an inspirational and educational traveling exhibit about this significant aspect of aviation history.
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Get out the black vote
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Black History
Get out the black vote
New restrictions on voting such as the closing down of polling places, purges of voter data rolls, restrictions on voting days and language access all amount to a valid attempt to take away the right to vote for minorities and people of color.
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When it’s dangerous to be yourself
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Black History
When it’s dangerous to be yourself
Afrocentric hairstyles such as natural crowns, elaborate braids, twists and locs are beautiful, but natural hair wearers are often met with discrimination in the workplace and at school.
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Why Black History Month is still important
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Black History
Why Black History Month is still important
Black History Month began as a “Negro History Week” in 1926. Scholar and historian Carter G. Woodson chose the second week in February, as it contained the birthdays of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln, to bring awareness to African Americans’ role in shaping U.S. history. President Gerald Ford decreed Black History Month a national observance in 1976.
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Women’s History: Who was Melnea A. Cass?
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News
Women’s History: Who was Melnea A. Cass?
In the 1920s, the Cass family moved to Roxbury. With her husband Marshall’s support, Melnea A. Cass began what would be a long career as a volunteer community activist for human rights. It was in the 1930s that Cass began a lifetime of volunteer work on the local, state and national level.
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Byron Rushing: U.S. still grappling with color line
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Local News
Byron Rushing: U.S. still grappling with color line
Former state Rep. Byron Rushing, who served in the Massachusetts House from 1983 to this year, reflected on the problems of this century, inspired by W.E.B. Du Bois’ famous use of the phrase in his 1903 book, “The Souls of Black Folk.”
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Black history is American history
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Black History
Black history is American history
In 2018, the tomb holding Martin Luther King Jr. was covered in plastic while workers spruced up the reflecting pool that surrounds it. Written in the tiles is King’s promise that he will never be satisfied “until justice rolls down like water and righteousness like a mighty stream.”
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William Monroe Trotter: A race man
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Black History
William Monroe Trotter: A race man
William Monroe Trotter considered his newspaper, the Guardian, to be in the abolitionist tradition. His idol was William Lloyd Garrison, editor of the Liberator, and leader of the abolitionist movement in the United States. Trotter kept a bust of Garrison on his desk. In 1908 when office space became available, Trotter opened the downtown offices of the Guardian in the same building on Cornhill which had once housed the Liberator.
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Booker T. Washington’s message to young African Americans in Cambridge
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Black History
Booker T. Washington’s message to young African Americans in Cambridge
On the night of Sept. 2, 1903, national black leader Booker Taliaferro Washington delivered a short but uplifting address to young black Cantabrigians on the importance of saving, purchasing property and going into business. Invited by then-third Assistant U.S. District Attorney William Henry Lewis, Washington spoke at Mt. Olive Baptist Church (now known as the Massachusetts Avenue Baptist Church).
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Why we remember
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Black History
Why we remember
The creator of what’s now known as Black History Month hoped for a day when it would no longer be required.
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