Close
Current temperature in Boston - 62 °
BECOME A MEMBER
Get access to a personalized news feed, our newsletter and exclusive discounts on everything from shows to local restaurants, All for free.
Already a member? Sign in.
The Bay State Banner
BACK TO TOP
The Bay State Banner
POST AN AD SIGN IN

Trending Articles

Haitian Unity Parade returns to Mattapan

Driver's license bill now on Gov’s desk

CFPB sues TransUnion on credit reporting violations

READ PRINT EDITION

Boston Police

Pioneering Black police officer William ‘Billy’ Celester, 78
read more
Local News
Pioneering Black police officer William ‘Billy’ Celester, 78
Former Boston police Superintendent William ‘Billy’ Celester died Monday at age 78.
>
Court ruling seen as blow to Boston police gang database
read more
News
Court ruling seen as blow to Boston police gang database
Justices of the U.S. First Circuit Court of Appeals on Monday ruled in favor of a Salvadoran immigrant’s petition to review a deportation order, finding in favor of his argument that a Boston Police Department gang database determination falsely identified him as a member of the MS-13 gang.
>
Council reins in police surveillance
read more
Politics
Council reins in police surveillance
After years of activism by civil rights groups, the Boston City Council passed an ordinance unanimously last week that increases transparency on police use of surveillance technology.
>
Local News
Essaibi George gets majority of cop donations
As candidates approach the finish line, financial support from police officers has been far higher on behalf of at-large City Councilor Annissa Essaibi George.
>
Youth activists demand cut to police budget
read more
Local News
Youth activists demand cut to police budget
On Saturday, June 26, activists from the Youth Justice and Power Union gathered at City Hall to demand a $120 million cut from the police budget and a cancellation of the new class of 250 police officers.
>
Local News
Council again passes crowd control ordinance
City Councilors Ricardo Arroyo and Andrea Campbell successfully passed for the second time an ordinance on limiting police crowd control weapons, a reform that acting Mayor Janey voted “yes” on while she was still in her seat as Council president.
>
Counselors, cops clash over tear gas
read more
Local News
Counselors, cops clash over tear gas
After a summer of protests, Boston city councilors are looking for more protocol on how the police control crowds. In a working session on Nov. 18, Councilors Andrea Campbell, Lydia Edwards and Ricardo Arroyo attempted to bring Boston police officers on board with restrictions on tear gas, projectiles and other crowd control weapons, but did not receive support.
>
BPD investigating overtime conflicts
read more
Local News
BPD investigating overtime conflicts
The Boston Police Department’s Bureau of Professional Standards is looking into data showing Boston police officers collecting overtime for court appearances while at the same time working outside of courthouses.
>
Little oversight on police court overtime
read more
Local News
Little oversight on police court overtime
The Boston Police Department pays millions of dollars in overtime, including for court appearances that can last minutes, but the city has little means of tracking how those dollars are spent, according to City Councilor Ricardo Arroyo.
>
Council seeks curb on facial recognition
read more
Local News
Council seeks curb on facial recognition
Boston city councilors are pushing to ban facial recognition, a surveillance software that disproportionately misidentifies people of color and may violate civil rights and basic privacies.
>
Mayor, activists differ on call to cut police budget
read more
Local News
Mayor, activists differ on call to cut police budget
Local activists seeking to defund the police are calling for a 10% cut to the budget. Mayor Martin Walsh has responded with a more modest 2.8% cut.
>
Hair test has city fighting legal battles on two fronts
read more
Uncategorized
Hair test has city fighting legal battles on two fronts
In 1999 the city began contracting with a hair-testing firm to determine whether Boston Police Department officers were using drugs. Twenty years later, the city is entangled in two sets of lawsuits: one is with black officers who say the hair test is discriminatory and the other with the Acton-based Psychemedics Corporation, the firm that to this day administers the tests on the city’s behalf.
>
Already a member? Sign in.
The Bay State Banner